Conspiracy Theories That You Actually Believe 📡

ThunderDan19

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Mar 14, 2011
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You make good points. My only counter on the fission issue is that it was already being developed in scientific research reactors outside the military applications by the time it was developed for war. Granted, it all happened very quickly, faster than I recalled prior to looking it up. Could the military have swooped in and recruited the best minds to work secretly just for them to develop the next quantum leap in tech? Maybe, but I would expect that science outside military applications would be working much more in parallel to exploit the potential of new technology, particularly with a society so determined to find new ways to produce clean energy.

Could the Soros/Rothschilds wealthy elites/Illuminati/deep state/etc. convince the US government to suppress any outside work on the technology? Maybe. But, do you think that both (diametrically opposed in world view) Obama and Trump would sign on to that suppression? Because that's likely what it would take.

BTW, I'm afraid to click on Epstein Drive. Sounds very very dirty... :p
 

ThunderDan19

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The Mythbusters would disagree about the viability of that technology (and a whole bunch of others they tried in that vein). Could a non-scientist come up with a world changing technology like that? Maybe. But I'd have to see more than a what was shown in the story to believe it ever actually delivered as advertised.

First hurdle would be how would you generate enough power to react out the hydrogen before the fuel cell even begins to generate hydrogen to burn to make the power? That's usually about where these inventions fail. They sound plausible until you get into just how much energy input is needed vs. produced. It's very hard to match fossil fuels on that. Only need water (any water, salt water)? Never rusts, gums up or wears out? Sounds TGTBT.

It may well be true, but the burden of proof is always upon the person who makes the claim. And, if some Joe can just invent this tech in his garage, why isn't it readily available in say, Japan (or anywhere else)? They have to import all their fuel so it would benefit them immensely, way more than us. And there's plenty of very intelligent people in that country. And fuel is more expensive pretty much everywhere else (outside the producer countries), so you'd think they'd be the ones motivated to come up with a solution. Still, not claiming it's impossible, just wondering why this guy is the only one ever who came up with this idea and then "realized" it.

There's always the claim that "big" or "deep" this or that "killed" whatever new tech came along that threatened their business model. While I'm sure they did whatever they could not to promote it, most often these things fail under their own weight when something does not live up to the claims promised. And sometimes the people promoting them just mishandle the promotion and production (Tesla - the guy, not the company). Put the right guy out there at the front (Musk, Jobs, Bezos) and fully functional new tech gets fully refined into a mainstream juggernaut.
 

pcsguy88

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www.fighting118th.com
I’m extremely skeptical myself, but there are other inventions that have been squashed that actually worked. One was an Indian guy who made something simple that greatly improved fuel mileage. I believe TaTa eventually bought the rights and then it vanished. Let me look it up.
 

ThunderDan19

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Story seems to cut off at the end and it took a long way to get there as you mentioned, even skimming past most of the story telling. It seems like perhaps other innovations have paralleled his approach (like perhaps that similar concept from GE - stolen?) and other tech progressed while he awaited an opportunity to present his findings scientifically. Proof of concept is critical before any company is willing to retool and spend millions on new products. Engines are a lot more efficient now than in 1999, so I wonder if it was just his misfortune that he wasn't an R&D guy at one of the big car companies instead of just a backwater guy from India.

It really is too bad that non-connected people have such a difficult time bringing their innovations to market. I think it is a result of "big" companies and governments maintaining stupid high barriers to entry as well as just how complex and expensive some of these technologies have become. However, if people are able to find the funding and support needed (Shark Tank?), the free market is always open to innovation. Who doesn't want new tech to make their lives easier/more fun/cheaper/etc.?